Whitgift Film Theatre Grimsby North East Lincolnshire UK BITTER HARVESTTHE GREAT WALLONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST PATRIOTS DAY
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THE FOUNDER   

THE FOUNDER tells the fascinating true story of Ray Kroc (Michael Keaton), a traveling salesman from Oak Park, Illinois. Ray has spent most of his life pitching various products to business owners, but none have ever amounted to anything substantial. While on the road pitching milkshake mixers to various restaurants, Ray stumbles upon a burger stand in San Bernardino, Calfornia that has just placed an order for six mixers. Stunned that anyone would order more than one, Ray drives to San Bernardino to see the operation for himself. When he arrives, he sees a restaurant, unlike anything that he has ever seen before. Ray sees McDonald’s, a new kind of fast food restaurant where anyone can order a burger that will be ready to eat in under 30 seconds. Intrigued and curious to learn more about the operation, Ray meets with Mac (John Carroll Lynch) and Dick McDonald (Nick Offerman), the two brothers that own the McDonald’s. Mac and Dick share their story about how they planned the restaurant and how it quickly became an overnight success. Determined that McDonald’s can be the first great fast food franchise, Ray pitches his idea to the brothers. While initially hesitant to let Ray become part of the business, Mac and Dick decide to write up a contract giving Ray the right to sell McDonald franchises, but only if he adheres to the strict details as outlined in the contract. As Ray Kroc, Keaton continues to amaze and delivers his finest performance to date. This role demonstrates what a tour-de-force performance looks like. Keaton completely disappears into this role and becomes the smooth talking Ray Kroc. His performance is mesmerizing because he sells the audience on Kroc’s dreams and ambitions early on. As a viewer, you initially root for Kroc because he seems like an average guy that just happened to stumble upon a great opportunity. However, about halfway through the film, Kroc begins to show his true colors. Greed takes over, and he becomes obsessed with making McDonald’s work no matter what it takes. Ray Kroc becomes a ruthless man that was so persistent that he couldn’t be stopped. The film captures this personal transition perfectly as well as how Kroc treated those in his life including his wife Ethel (Laura Dern).  THE FOUNDER is without question one of the best films of the year. It is well-acted, directed, and written. In the end, this is probably one of the most brutal and honest depictions of corporate greed ever captured on film.

(12A) 115 mins Thursday 27th April 2017 7:30pm
Director: John Lee Hancock
Stars: Michael Keaton, Nick Offerman, John Carroll Lynch

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Thursday 27th April
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


HIDDEN FIGURES   

The spirit of The Help endures in the irresistible and uplifting movie HIDDEN FIGURES. The “hidden figures” of the film are math whiz Katherine Johnson (Taraji P. Henson), super supervisor Dorothy Jackson (Octavia Spencer), and sassy Mary Jackson (Janelle Monae), three women who should be working in higher roles above ground, but they’re tucked away in the “coloured” section doing hard work for paltry pay. This timely drama from director Theodore Melfi wears its “based on a true story” badge on its sleeve as it shares the untold story of the Black women of NASA who helped put a man in space. Henson gives an extraordinary performance as Katherine, the shiest and quietest of the three women. As she enters the top security program and checks the calculations of NASA’s biggest mission ever, Henson creates a woman who hides within herself and survives through invisibility. Spencer is characteristically strong and funny in full-on Minnie Jackson mode, while Monae brings great screen presence to the tale. HIDDEN FIGURES rounds out its ensemble with strong performers like Kevin Costner’s dependable supervisor, Mahershala Ali’s charming love interest, and Kirsten Dunst’s uptight racist. The women’s dogged refusal to cede their places on a team that keeps trying to reject them is a moving display of heroism which makes HIDDEN FIGURES a stirring indictment of racism and a testimonial to the enormous contribution which these women and many other like them made to the success of the space program.

(PG) 127 mins Friday 28th, Saturday 29th April 2017 7:30pm
Director: Theodore Melfi
Stars: Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monáe

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 28th April
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

Saturday 29th April
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


BITTER HARVEST  

Based on one of the most overlooked tragedies of the 20th Century, BITTER HARVEST is a powerful story of love, honor, rebellion and survival as seen through the eyes of two young lovers caught in the ravages of Joseph Stalin’s genocidal policies against Ukraine in the 1930s.  As Stalin advances the ambitions of the burgeoning Soviet Union, a young artist named Yuri (Max Irons) battles to survive famine, imprisonment and torture to save his childhood sweetheart Natalka (Samantha Barks) from the “Holodomor,” the death-by-starvation program which ultimately killed millions of Ukrainians.  Against this tragic backdrop, Yuri escapes from a Soviet prison and joins the anti-Bolshevik resistance movement as he battles to reunite with Natalka and continue the fight for a free Ukraine. Filmed on location in Ukraine, this epic love story brings to light one of the most devastating chapters of modern European hstory.  The stellar cast also includes Barry Pepper, Tamer Hassan and Terence Stamp.

(15) 103 mins Wednesday 3rd, Thursday 4th May 2017 7:30pm
Director: George Mendeluk
Stars: Max Irons, Samantha Barks, Terence Stamp

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Wednesday 3rd May
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

Thursday 4th May
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


THE GREAT WALL  

The long-awaited Chinese-Hollywood epic THE GREAT WALL was helmed by superstar Chinese director Zhang Yimou, backed by Chinese-owned Hollywood studio Legendary, with a cast featuring Chinese A-listers as well as Matt Damon, making it the most expensive film ever made in China. Foreign mercenaries William Garin (Matt Damon) and Pero Tovar (Pedro Pascal) unwittingly stumble upon the wall while fleeing tribesmen, greeted by an enormous army and the stunning sweep of the enormous structure rising from the mist. Their claims to be traders are swiftly debunked and Garin falls over himself to demonstrate his skills as a fighter, earning the gradual respect of the so-called Nameless Order and its leader, General Shao (Zhang Hanyu). After displaying an ability to leap in headfirst and slash green-blooded monsters, Garin lends his support to Deputy Commander Lin (played by Jing Tian), while a baffled Tovar plans his escape with the Order’s gunpowder. A dishevelled Garin spends much of the film struggling to comprehend the system the Order embodies, confused and humbled by the language and the culture. His life-saving acts of heroism are returned with just as much aplomb. Meanwhile the Order does need all hands on deck, because things get gory very quickly. Barely 15 minutes into the film soldiers are being dismembered by Taotie (a group of flesh-eating monsters who scale the Great Wall every 60 years to feed) in a series of high-octane battles. William is a proficient warrior and willing collaborator, but it is Lin and Strategist Wang (Andy Lau) who discover the key to defeating the beasts and spearhead the pivotal assault. THE GREAT WALL never misses an opportunity to marvel at the might and ingenuity of the Chinese military, from its use of gunpowder to its elaborate weaponry, which incorporates everything from hot air balloons to bungee cords. Men and women are equally adept on the battlefield, while imperial courtiers are shamed for their cowardice and pandering. Damon cuts a fine figure as William, finding redemption from his chequered past but it is Jing who stands out in an otherwise all-male cast. As an example of a great action film, this wall stands firm indeed. (English/Mandarin with subtitles)

(12A) 103 mins Saturday 6th May 2017 7:30pm
Director: Yimou Zhang
Stars: Matt Damon, Tian Jing, Willem Dafoe

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Saturday 6th May
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST  

Milos Forman's ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST (1975) is arguably the most poignant cinematic social satire to ever come from a major Hollywood studio – a tragic drama with streaks of bittersweet comedy lined throughout. The film uses a remote mental institute as a metaphor for society, and its odd inhabitants are likewise supposed to represent those of us who allow ourselves to be pacified by bureaucratic oppressors. Randle McMurphy has been sentenced to a mental rehabilitation centre after being convicted of assault and statutory rape of a minor. Fearing jail, he begins to act insane and is transferred to the institute, where the employees are convinced that he is faking mental illness. Randle arrives for a six-week visit at the institute dressed in the clothes of a grimy everyman, complete with a beanie cap and a smug grin on his face that reeks of self-confidence. Randle soon finds that life at the institute is not as pleasant as he assumed it might be – Nurse Mildred Ratched (Louise Fletcher) takes an immediate disliking to Randle's rebellious nature, as he continually sparks uprisings amongst the crowd of typically indifferent patients, most of who are startled by Randle's fearless attitude. He leads his troops into battle against Nurse Ratched, challenging the triviality of daily events, questioning everyday schedules and programs, escaping to go on boat trips, and throwing wild parties in the middle of the night. Randle, through his irreverent approach to life, befriends Chief Bromden (Will Sampson), who is described early on as "dead and dumb." Of course, he isn't, and Randle's relationship with "Chief" eventually defines the essence of the film. By the finale, we realize that the story is really being told through Chief's perspective, and Randle is the link to the rest of the story. The film is not a critique of modern psychiatric treatment. Instead, Forman aims higher at a monumental allegory about society, and in doing so creates a masterpiece of comedy and drama. The film owes most of its success to Nicholson with a career-defining performance that has never been surpassed – he isn't just playing McMurphy, he is McMurphy. With the beanie cap and the faded jeans and the general cynical edge of a man abandoned by society, Nicholson portrays McMurphy flawlessly. The movie took home all five primary Oscars in 1975, making it the first film since "It Happened One Night" (1934) to make a clean sweep of Best Director, Best Actress, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Picture. Needless to say, ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST deserved them all and is still an amazing motion picture, even 40 years later.

(15) 133 mins Wednesday 10th May 2017 7:30pm
Director: Milos Forman
Stars: Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Michael Berryman

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Wednesday 10th May
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 PATRIOTS DAY  

April 15th, 2013. Another event that changed America occurred at the yearly Boston Marathon where six people were killed and hundreds more injured as two bombs, seconds apart, ripped through the crowds and runners at the finish line of the historic sports event. Such was the heroism and community solidarity on display that day that it was inevitable it would be brought into the realm of drama to pay tribute to the those involved and to the city itself, and in the hands of Mark Wahlberg, Bostonian born-and-bred, and director Peter Berg, the heroes have been given a powerful and moving cinematic remembrance in PATRIOTS DAY.  Wahlberg leads the cast as Tommy Saunders, a local Boston policeman who is slowly recovering from a knee injury and one of his first assignments back on the job is on the finishing line of the race. As the bombs go off and the manhunt and investigations begin, Saunders is our eyes into what happened and how the next few days played out as he and his fellow officers, as well as the FBI and intelligence agencies, try to piece together the road map that will lead them to those responsible. Adding to the realism is the superb cast with a fantastic anchoring performance from Wahlberg. He rarely gets the credit he deserves for his acting but he is superb in the lead role. The trifecta behind him of Kevin Bacon, John Goodman and J.K. Simmons add gravitas and poignancy to proceedings as you would expect with Simmons in particular at the peak of his powers here. PATRIOTS DAY is both stirring and dramatic and is a worthy and thoughtful retelling of a tragic day in Boston.

(15) 130 mins Friday 12th, Saturday 13th May 2017 7:30pm
Director: Peter Berg
Stars: Mark Wahlberg, Michelle Monaghan, J.K. Simmons

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 12th May
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

Saturday 13th May
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


UNDER THE SHADOW  

Writer/director Babak Anvari’s first feature, the Farsi-language horror movie UNDER THE SHADOW, is set in 1988 in a realistically recreated Tehran at the height of the Iran-Iraq war (and shot in Amman, Jordan), and is an allegory of the powerful forces that the horrors of war can unleash. Shideh is an educated Westernised woman, passionate about becoming a doctor. But even though she dresses herself in a chador now that fundamentalist Ayatollah Khomeini is in power, she is distraught to be refused permission by her medical school to continue her studies because of her past political involvement. Unable to work or study, in the safety of her home she wears Western clothes and exercises illicitly to a (forbidden) Jane Fonda aerobics video. She has no choice but to be a full-time – though loving – mother to her young daughter Dorsa. When her doctor husband Iraq is conscripted into national service in the battlefield, she is left alone with Dorsa in their apartment block. Young war-orphan Mehdi, living with their superstitious neighbours, the Ebrahimis, tells Dorsa about evil spirits called djinns, who travel on the wind. When a mysteriously unexploded Iraqi missile crashes through the roof of the apartment block and cracks appear in the ceiling of the living room of Shideh’s apartment, it seems to have unleashed these malign supernatural forces. Dorsa’s doll goes missing and, if the djinns have taken it, the superstition says they can possess the child’s soul. Shideh fights to find the doll and save her child in the face of realistic and malicious supernatural hallucinations. As the Iraqi air raids on Tehran step up, mother and daughter seek refuge from the bombing in the cellar. The djinn manifestations also become more insistent, but Shideh stubbornly refuses to leave Tehran with Dorsa for the safety of the countryside. Is she losing her grip on reality while under enormous pressure or is the supernatural really manifesting itself in this overheated crisis? As well as being a very scary and atmospheric horror movie, UNDER THE SHADOW is implicitly about female oppression and resilience in the Iranian society of the time – at one point Shideh is arrested by the revolutionary guard for being in the street with Dorsa without being covered with a chador as she flees desperately with her daughter to escape the djinn – a misdemeanour punishable by lashes. And as the djinn grow bolder, the form it takes with a monstrously engulfing chador threatens Shideh and Dorsa’s lives. UNDER THE SHADOW is tense, unusual and well worth seeing. It’s a must-see even for non-horror fans. (Persian with subtitles)

(15) 84 mins Wednesday 17th May 2017 7:30pm
Director: Babak Anvari
Stars: Narges Rashidi, Avin Manshadi, Bobby Naderi

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Wednesday 17th May
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


VICEROY’S HOUSE   

VICEROY’S HOUSE is the intimate and indeed epic true story of the 1947 handing over of power in India from the British Empire back to its people after three centuries of rule. Hugh Bonneville assumes the role of the last Viceroy of India, and indeed Queen Victoria’s great-grandson Lord Mountbatten, the man tasked with overseeing the transition. The film, which is huge in scale, focusses its attention on the Partition of India and particularly the Viceroy’s House of the title, which at the time held 500 staff made up of Muslim, Hindu and Sikh servants. The movie covers the brewing conflict as decisions are made to create a new Muslim homeland, Pakistan, as political leaders including Nehru, Jinnah and Gandhi come together in the house to wrangle over the birth of independent India. While the scope of this movie is epic, Guriner Chadha’s film is also a very intimate one, with the heart of the story focusing on a young Hindu servant, Jeet (Manish Dayal), and his intended Muslim bride, Aalia (Huma Qureshi). Hugh Bonneville stands firm as the central character of Mountbatten, while Gillian Anderson is also solid as Lady Edwina. There is much to feast on in this emotional, massively informative, ambitious and intimate piece from Chadha and her team. VICEROY’S HOUSE brilliantly manages to capture the upsetting historical and emotional events of this pivotal time in Indian history.

(12A) 106 mins Friday 19th, Saturday 20th May 2017 7:30pm
Director: Gurinder Chadha
Stars: Gillian Anderson, Michael Gambon, Hugh Bonneville

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 19th May
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

Saturday 20th May
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


MOONLIGHT   

The fragility and preciousness of the spirit, the odds that are stacked against sensitivity, the distortions that can be inflicted on the soul — these are familiar subjects and sources of passion in literature and film. In MOONLIGHT, the story of a young man who grows up in a terrible place, they find fresh and renewed expression. What’s it like to be a young boy on the drug-filled streets of Miami without friends, without family, without hope? As cliques begin to feign superiority by ganging up on the weak to prove themselves to be hard enough for what’s coming, Chiron (Alex R. Hibbert) — or “Little” as they call him — can do nothing but struggle to survive. How Chiron handles this dual-faceted dynamic of growing up around a dog-eat-dog mentality he doesn’t share will place him on a path towards an adulthood he may never have believed possible. He can remain the sweet, confused Chiron we’ve met from the start who has trouble looking people in the eyes or opening up enough to utter three words let alone something deeply personal. Or he can adopt the nickname “Black” to start over as a man who demands respect out fear rather than love. Adapted from a Tarell McCraney play, MOONLIGHT is a quietly introspective depiction steeped in unparalleled honesty of the ways in which we’re saved and damned throughout our lives. It’s also a portrayal of life’s circuitous nature with unwitting role models projecting an image for the next generation to aspire towards and copy despite not necessarily being representative of who they are beneath its artificial veneer. Every year, we get only a few of these, movies that come out of nowhere, that are different, unexpected and wonderfully right. MOONLIGHT is that kind of movie, one of the gems of 2016.

(15) 108 mins Thursday 25th May 2017 7:30pm
Director: Barry Jenkins
Stars: Mahershala Ali, Shariff Earp, Duan Sanderson

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Thursday 25th May
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 A QUIET PASSION  

“You are alone in your revolution, Ms. Dickinson,” spouts a stoic headmistress in the opening sequence of A QUIET PASSION, a biopic of 19th-century American poet Emily Dickinson and the latest work from director Terence Davies. This is an exquisitely considered film, which shows the writer from her late teens (portrayed by Emma Bell) through to adulthood (Cynthia Nixon) and old age. Nixon and Davies’ Dickinson comes off as a battle-hardened, often self-deprecating woman, but also proudly spirited and, at least in her early years, with a tremendous appetite for joy, humour, and life. Content with — or perhaps accepting of — a life in the family home, the film only fleetingly delves into the writer’s romantic life. A brief, significant moment with a married reverend offers the least-ambiguous insight. As Emily states to her sister, “Those of us who live minor lives, and are denied a particular kind of love, find it easiest to starve.” Nixon excels in this choice role, bringing bags of warmth and spirit to Dickinson while retaining the ability to wield a sharp edge whenever called upon. The actress’ famously open, aghast expressions are used to great effect in Passion‘s more comedic moments, of which there are surprisingly many. Nixon and her supporting players succeed in making their characters both human and of their time. The great theme of Dickinson’s life, Davies argues, is finding solace — not in religion, but in art. A QUIET PASSION presents a stirring portrait of an amazing woman, creating a sometimes hilarious, and at other times heart-wrenching, biopic, with a captivating lead performance, and strong supporting cast.

(12A) 125 mins Friday 26th, Saturday 27th May 2017 7:30pm
Director: Terence Davies
Stars: Cynthia Nixon, Jennifer Ehle, Duncan Duff

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 26th May
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

Saturday 27th May
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


ANOTHER MOTHER’S SON  

Based on the extraordinary true story of Louisa Gould, ANOTHER MOTHER’S SON is a tale of love, loyalty and betrayal set against the backdrop of Nazi occupation on the Channel Islands during the Second World War. The film features Jenny Seagrove as Louisa and Julian Kostov as Bill, the Russian fugitive from the slave labour camps set up by the Nazis on the island who she hides in plain sight among other Jersey inhabitants; a cavalier attitude that would end up being her undoing. Betrayed by her neighbours, Louisa is arrested by the Nazis, tried for treason and sentenced to imprisonment in Germany. At the end of the war, as liberators begin to clear up the scene of devastation at Ravensbruck concentration camp, hundreds of miles away, Lou’s glasses, fixed for her by Bill years before, are thrown on a pile with hundreds of others. She was among the hundreds of thousands of victims whose lives were needlessly extinguished in the gas chambers of the camp, one month before the end of the war and liberation. Bill returned to Russia and after being shunned by his community, as most prisoners of war were on their return, settled down and lived a happy life - a life indebted to the Jersey woman who showed him true compassion and paid the ultimate sacrifice. No one has ever admitted responsibility for Louisa’s betrayal, and a plaque was unveiled in her honour in 1995 by her surviving son Ralph and Bill, the man she saved. ANOTHER MOTHER’S SON is a moving testimonial to a largely forgotten chapter in the history of those terrible times.

(12A) 103 mins Thursday 1st June 2017 7:30pm
Director: Christopher Menaul
Stars: Jenny Seagrove, John Hannah, Julian Kostov

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Thursday 1st June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


BEAUTY AND THE BEAST  

The tale of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, as old as time, has been remastered and has shed its cartoon skin for a more glamorous almost human cast. Emma Watson perfectly portraits our favorite book lover. Fellow co-stars include Dan Stevens, Luke Evans, Josh Gad, Kevin Kline, and many more. This all-star cast creates a magical movie to enthrall young and old. The story has not changed much; Belle (Emma Watson) is the strange girl in town because she is a bookworm in an old fashioned village. The garish and pompous Gaston (Luke Evans), with LeFou (Josh Gad) trailing close by, is determined to win the one girl who does not swoon at his industrial sized feet. Maurice (Kevin Kline), Belle’s father, is not a bumbling inventor but a tinkerer. He finishes a beautiful music box just in time to leave for the market, where he promptly gets lost and finds himself in front of a forsaken castle in the snow. When Maurice’s horse returns home without his owner, Belle has the horse return her to where her father was left. The Beast (Dan Stevens) has taken Maurice hostage forever, and Belle steps in and takes his place as the Beast’s prisoner. Before long Belle and The Beast are best of friends finding they have much in common. Through a looking glass, Belle can see her father is suffering and the Beast, now in love with the beautiful girl, releases her to save her dad. Belle returns just in time to tell a dying Beast that she loves him. All the classic songs from the original are there and performed with dazzling effect. If you are a fan or even a newbie to this Disney classic, you will walk away satisfied and sated. Once again Disney have cast their magic spell, creating a modern romantic fable with lavish visuals and wickedly entertaining performances in BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

(PG) 129 mins Friday 2nd, Saturday 3rd June 2017 7:30pm
Director: Bill Condon
Stars: Emma Watson, Dan Stevens, Luke Evans

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 2nd June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

Saturday 3rd June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


20TH CENTURY WOMEN  

Sweet-minded and shimmering in its comedic beats and even more irresistible in its dive into the dramatic elements, 20TH CENTURY WOMEN is one the year’s most pleasant surprises. The film tells the story of three women: Dorothea (Annette Bening), Abbie (Greta Gerwig) and Julie (Elle Fanning). The women explore love and freedom in Southern California during the late 1970s. In the middle of their self- examinations is Jamie (Lucas Jade Zumann), Dorothea’s son, a young boy trying to come to terms with his own self. 20TH CENTURY WOMEN assembles scenes of ascertained wisdom. This is the master stroke in the actual creation of its central characters, all authentic and genuinely real. Mills’ casual hand at storytelling reveals itself as something much deeper by film’s end. He captures the essence of humanity, giving a refreshing peek into the dimension and clash between generations, all with their own unique voice. This film deserves every bit of emotion it wrenches from your soul. It is a human comedy that touches the human factor.

(15) 116 mins Thursday 8th June 2017 7:30pm
Director: Mike Mills
Stars: Annette Bening, Elle Fanning, Greta Gerwig

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Thursday 8th June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


ELLE  

Paul Verhoeven’s ELLE is a diabolically gleeful black comedy brimming with sly social commentary. It is a perfect film and a launching pad for an erotic suspense thriller packed with thematic material regarding the thin line between sociopathic and psychopathic behavior. Isabelle Huppert is the only actress in the world who could pull off such an incredible high-wire act, and she does it with delicious aplomb. The ubiquitous Huppert plays Michele, an anti-heroine unlike anything you’ve ever imagined. Her occupation as the head of company that creates bizarre video games is an ideal outlet for her unique set of social skills that tend to involve her voracious bi-sexual appetite. Michele’s highly polished survival instincts derive from a trauma she suffered when she was 10 after her father went on a neighborhood killing spree that claimed 27 human victims and many animal fatalities before he returned home to Michele whose assistance he employed in burning down the family residence. Her psyche is as pre-disastered as her ego is well defended. Still, Michele is not immune to attack. After being raped by a masked intruder, Michele toughens up even more rather than involve the police. Michele’s childhood experiences with law enforcement have forever soured her from seeking assistance from Johnny law. She’d rather fantasize about exacting revenge against a rapist that she correctly presumes will return for more. Michele treats friends, family, and employees with equal ironic disdain. The effect is dark hilarity. Michele takes no prisoners, and neither does Verhoeven in a film that flouts conventional wisdom about degrees of misogyny, feminism, sexual intrigue, and individuality. Daring, ribald, and scathing on every level, ELLE is a movie that sets a standard that 21st century cinema should aspire to. It kicks Hollywood in the teeth without lifting a finger - glory. (French with subtitles)

(18) 128 mins Friday 9th June 2017 7:30pm
Director: Paul Verhoeven
Stars: Isabelle Huppert, Laurent Lafitte, Anne Consigny

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 9th June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN  

Featuring a host of sparkling musical numbers and several iconic set pieces, Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly's 1952 masterpiece SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN is undoubtedly one of the finest musicals to have come out of Hollywood. The year is 1927 and we are poised to enter both the Golden Age of Hollywood and the dawning of the 'talkies'. Don Lockwood (Gene Kelly) and Lina Lamont (Jean Hagen), on-screen lovers adored by the public, are at the zenith of their careers, but with the advent of sound their stardom is under threat. The problem is that Lina, whilst easy on the eye, has a shrill voice that would have audiences rolling in the aisles. Fortunately, Don happens upon the beautiful Kathy Seldon (Debbie Reynolds), a chorus girl hungry for fame with the voice of an angel. In order to save his latest picture, Don and best friend Cosmo Brown (Donald O'Connor) convince Kathy to provide the voice to Lena's on-screen performance - but will Lena agree to share the limelight? The magic of this timeless musical lies not just in Kelly's breathtaking dance numbers or the plethora of now classic songs (provided by Arthur Freed and Nacio Herb Brown), but in how it captures the glory of Hollywood in the transition from the silent film to talkie era. Behind SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN’s charming central characters, Donen throws the studio system up onto the screen for all to see. The film's musical numbers (choreographed by Kelly himself), are now the stuff of movie legend. From the slapstick performance of O'Connor in Make 'Em Laugh, through to the water-drenched, brolly-twirling spectacle of Kelly's titular show-stopper, the action blends the musical hall with the big screen with truly star-studded style. Yet arguably SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN’s greatest legacy is that it reminds us all of the magic of cinema, a world where it's perfectly acceptable to burst into song and dance mid-sentence - and where happy endings are ever after.

(U) 103 mins Thursday 15th June 2017 7:30pm
Directors: Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly
Stars: Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor, Debbie Reynolds

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Thursday 15th June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 THE LOST CITY OF Z  

From the outset, THE LOST CITY OF Z comes on like a classic adventure tale, one where a governmentally decorated go-getter seeks discovery, excitement, and a sterling reputation in an unknown land where his life is worth little more than a possible dinner for a hungry local tribe. And to his credit, director James Gray delivers that movie with all the ribbons and bows on it. On his first expedition, Colonel Pirceval Fawcett, played with physical ingenuity and dramatic intensity by Charlie Hunnam, loses at least two colleagues to spears and another to a swarm of ravenous piranhas. At one point, he nearly dies the same way, near-blind and underwater. And yet, Gray’s adaptation of David Grann‘s beloved bestseller is a far quieter, more ruminative, and confidently intimate movie than all that would suggest. This is the story of a true progressive in the political sense, refusing to believe that the aristocracy was the beginning and the end of all civilization, but Gray rightly also sees the stubborn, vindictive, and lethally ambitious side of Fawcett as well. In fact, he highlights it. This is the story of a true progressive, but it’s also the story of a man who needed the world to know that he was better than the class label that they stamped him with the minute he came into the world. One would hope on the evidence of this movie, this masterpiece, that Gray would have studios lining up to back whatever his next movie might be for in THE LOST CITY OF Z he has made a film that is contemplative, resonantly melancholic, wise, and cuttingly personal.

(15) 141 mins Friday 16th, Saturday 17th June 2017 7:30pm
Director: James Gray
Stars: Charlie Hunnam, Robert Pattinson, Sienna Miller

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 16th June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

Saturday 17th June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 THE SALESMAN  

Asghar Farhadi is a film director of such consistent quality and control that the prospect of one of his new films is like buying the latest big fat novel by a favourite author. Farhadi's latest, THE SALESMAN, sees the apparently happy and comfortable life of a young couple thrown into turmoil by the blows of fate. Emad (Shahab Hosseini) and Rana (Taraneh Alidoosti) are husband and wife. They are both actors as well, preparing a carefully censored version of Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman for performance. Before we properly meet our protagonists disaster strikes. The building is collapsing, the windows cracking under the strain and the apartment complex has to be evacuated. Fortunately, another member of the acting troupe, Babak (Babak Karimi), owns an empty apartment and can put them up until they find somewhere else, or they can even rent it from him in the long term. The apartment seems fine, though the former tenant has left one locked room packed with her personal belongings. The crisis has been averted and Emad moves through his life with confidence and calm. He is a schoolteacher and his control of his charges, his ease and competence can be seen in the respect and liking that his students have for him. It can also be seen in his acting - he plays Willy Loman and his wife plays Loman's wife Linda - where he is unshowy and collected in his performance. However, one evening Rana buzzes up a stranger, thinking it is her husband returned and is attacked while in the shower. The violence is not portrayed and there is an ambiguity to what exactly happened. There are bloody footsteps on the stairs and Rana is hospitalised with a nasty injury, but the question that everyone asks and at the same time avoids is: was she raped? The police are not called and Emad is eager to return to normal. However, Rana is traumatised and unable to continue normally. She wants Emad to take time off and stay with her. The new apartment is now a hell to her because in what should be the safety of her new home she feels only violation. Emad himself turns detective as the attacker has left his telephone and some car keys. He searches until he finds the lock that fits the key and all the time his life begins to slowly unravel. The play is disrupted when Rana can no longer perform and Emad becomes uncharacteristically tetchy with his charges at school, confronting one child with an anger that comes from home. As the mystery is resolved things can only get worse as now Emad has the opportunity for revenge and the moral ambiguity of vengeance; the toxic cocktail of anger and glee and the original pain are mixed. THE SALESMAN is a rich and complex take on guilt and anger following the crime, the repercussions of which reverberate throughout the film. (Persian with subtitles)

(12A) 124 mins Wednesday 21st June 2017 7:30pm
Director: Asghar Farhadi
Stars: Taraneh Alidoosti, Shahab Hosseini, Babak Karimi

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Wednesday 21st June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 THE SENSE OF AN ENDING  

A couple of years ago, audiences fell in love with Indian director Ritesh Batra’s genuine gem of a debut, “The Lunchbox,” in which an accountant on the brink of retirement exchanges intimate notes with the complete stranger who has been cooking for him each day. That low-key treasure displayed Batra’s unique touch for the subtle sense of longing and mystery that can haunt men of a certain age, and proved to be an ideal precursor to the director’s first English-language film, THE SENSE OF AN ENDING, a well-acted, if somewhat trickier dish to digest, focusing on a British divorcé’s futile search for closure to a long-ago relationship. Fusty curmudgeon Tony Webster (Jim Broadbent) appears content to have traded his ambitions as a poet for a life spent tending a tiny vintage camera shop. It was an early girlfriend, Veronica (Freya Mavor/Charlotte Rampling), who gave Tony his first Leica camera, though the humiliation of losing her to an old schoolmate also seems to have shaped his younger self (Billy Howle). But whose love was Tony more devastated to lose: hers or the golden boy (Adrian) they both admired? Tony’s rather unflattering plunge into self-absorption begins with the receipt of a letter, and like those wonderful thoughts that take shape only gradually over the course of several days in “The Lunchbox,” he takes rather a long time to get around to reading it. The letter refers to a diary, which once belonged to Adrian but had since passed into the hands of Veronica’s mother, Sarah (Emily Mortimer), for reasons that aren’t entirely clear — though in bequeathing it to Tony Sarah dredges the past back up again. The movie, which fairly pulses with a latent homoeroticism just beneath the surface every time its hot-blooded young characters look at one another, teases us with possible explanations: What exactly is the nature of Tony and Adrian’s past relationship? Does Tony fancy both Veronica and her mother, or perhaps it’s her brother who occupies his solitary late-night fantasies? And what does his ex-wife (Harriet Walter) — or their very pregnant daughter (Michelle Dockery) — make of all this? The explanation is at once simpler and more complicated than any of these questions could suggest, and it is revealed only after the last of the onion’s layers has been peeled away.  Tony’s journey in THE SENSE OF AN ENDING offers a poignant commentary on how each of us attempts to make meaning of our lives, distorting memories and destroying documentation to suit agendas we can’t entirely rationalize. It’s a fundamental human impulse to seek meaning in things, and yet, as Tony ultimately realizes, the corollary to the butterfly effect — where the smallest incident can have a seismic impact on other people’s lives — is admitting that sometimes we’ve left absolutely no impression at all.

(15) 108 mins Friday 23rd June 2017 7:30pm
Director: Ritesh Batra
Stars: Jim Broadbent, Charlotte Rampling, Harriet Walter

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 23rd June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 A DOG’S PURPOSE  

Retelling a story from a unique perspective, and opening the audience's eyes to human nature through the voice of man's best friend, brings A DOG’S PURPOSE to life - captivating the audience through laughter, love, and tears.   Director Lasse Hallström has created a masterpiece based on W. Bruce Cameron's 2010 novel of the same name.  This is an emotionally touching story that should not be missed. This is the story of a dog which is reincarnated five times.  In each life, he tries to find his purpose for living. Is it fun? Is it food? Is it work?  Not all his lives are pleasant but along his journey he manages to make deep emotional ties, especially to Ethan, a little boy who needed the dog he named "Baileybaileybaileybaileybailey" as much as Bailey needed Ethan. Throughout his five lives, "Bailey" is reincarnated into different breeds of dogs but always seems to remember Ethan, no matter what befalls him along the way. Throughout the film, Ethan grows from a little boy to a teenager and, finally, to a grown man (Dennis Quaid).  Gheisar's Ethan is a child and he gives a wonderful performance bringing innocence of the love to the relationship between Ethan and Bailey. Nonetheless, even with such talent as Quaid and Gheisar, they are outshone by K.J. Apa's performance as the teenager Ethan. A DOG’S PURPOSE is quietly emotional and teaches some important life lessons with humour and tears at the same time.  This is a movie that needs to be watched and needs to be listened to closely.  Its message is clear- sometimes it's worth living a thousand lives until you get it right and find those you love over and over again.

(PG) 100 mins Saturday 24th June 2017 7:30pm
Director: Lasse Hallström
Stars: Josh Gad, Dennis Quaid, Peggy Lipton

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Saturday 24th June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 THE OLIVE TREE  

In THE OLIVE TREE, we meet Alma, a young girl with emotional problems and a special relationship with her grandfather Ramón, an old country man who stopped talking about 12 years ago after his son, Alma's father, sold a 2000-years-old olive tree in order to open a restaurant. Dominated by the sadness and the melancholia caused by the loss of his most beloved tree, Ramon spends his days visiting the place where the olive tree was planted, hoping for the day the tree returns. Unable to bear the situation any longer, Alma begins looking for the olive tree, discovering that it was acquired by a Germany energy company, located in Dusseldorf. Without money or resources, Alma convinces her uncle Alcachofa and her friend Rafa (who has a love interest for her) to go in a truck from Spain to Germany to recover the tree, starting a journey with unexpected consequences for everyone. THE OLIVE TREE speaks about believing again, about learning to trust again, about hope. Using humour and infinite nuances, THE OLIVE TREE manages, with just a handful of characters, to speak about our recent past, about our present time, and about any and all of us. (Spanish/German/French/English with subtitles)

(15) 99 mins Thursday 29th june 2017 7:30pm
Director: Icíar Bollaín
Stars: Anna Castillo, Javier Gutiérrez, Pep Ambròs

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Thursday 29th June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


   

THEIR FINEST is a nostalgic, jolly hockey sticks moving picture. But there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. "Authenticity informed by optimism" is the name of the game for British propaganda productions concerned with the morale of a blitzed public in the early years of World War Two and Danish director Lone Scherfig's film about filmmaking opts for a similar spirit of stiff upper-lipped positivity. It's full of the keep calm and carry-on attitude which characterised the era, where people firmly believe that a cup of tea can solve all. "Film is real life with the boring bits cut out," says Sam Claifin's wearying scriptwriter Tom Buckley with tongue firmly in cheek shortly after a young Welsh lady, Catrin Cole (Gemma Arterton, perfect in her role) joins their midst. Engaged primarily to write the "slop" - a somewhat degrading term for female dialogue - Catrin soon shows she has far more to offer. She, together with a terrific supporting turn by Rachael Stirling, is a resolute cat among stuffy pigeons who baulk at the notion of women with ideas above their station. "I know only my art," says Bill Nighy's scene-stealing ageing thespian Ambrose Hilliard. Never has the utterance of "semolina pudding" ever dripped with so much vigorous yearning and a cocked eyebrow here and there along with his wonderfully dry self-assurance make this one of the British actor's finest, most uproarious turns in years. Richard E. Grant, with a cameo as Whitehall man Roger Swain, says more with a sideways glance and slight rolling of the eyes than most could with pages of dialogue; Jeremy Irons is his gruff, commanding self as another higher up the food chain; Eddie Marsan is amusing in a buffoonish way as Hilliard's agent. The relationship that develops between Catrin and Tom, in spite of her marriage to a struggling artist (Jack Huston), is handled with restrained warmth which avoids any over-sentimentality, the two actors playing the caustic, frustrated friction of circumstance well. All onscreen are very concerned with making a worthwhile picture, a project to make a difference to the war effort and people in dire need of hope. THEIR FINEST by no means reinvents the wheel but in the hands of Scherfig - who previously directed An Education - it looks wonderful, has enough substance to back up its gleaming charm and is a very enjoyable period piece that wears its heart and intentions firmly on its well starched sleeve.

(15) 117 mins Friday 30th June, Saturday 1st July 2017 7:30pm
Director: Lone Scherfig
Stars: Gemma Arterton, Sam Claflin, Bill Nighy

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 30th June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

Saturday 1st July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


FRANTZ  

FRANTZ, the new work from French master François Ozon, showcases the director at his atmospheric best. This historical tale has the trappings of a ghost story as grieving widow Anna (Paula Beer in a heart-breaking performance) recovers from the loss of her husband Frantz during the Great War. But when Adrien (Pierre Niney), a teary-eyed Frenchman, arrives to pay his respects at the grave of Anna’s deceased German husband, the stranger reopens wounds between the two nations that are only beginning to heal in the aftermath of war. Ozon draws Anna and Adrien together as the French soldier becomes a surrogate for Frantz to the widow and her in-laws. The film resonates with the implied spirit of Frantz as Anna and Adrien revisit some of her late husband’s favourite memories and create moments of happiness to escape their sombre post-war disenchantment. Ozon stirringly evokes the return to happier times by manipulating the colour saturation of the film’s palette as heart-warming pastoral scenes mark a return to gaiety and innocence. Hope remains even in the shell-shocked ruins of Europe. The cinematography by Pascal Marti is truly exquisite as the crisp black and white images are sharply reserved and formal as the characters resemble mourners frozen in time, locked into a monochrome snapshot of grief. When the film blooms into palettes of colour, though, FRANTZ warms the heart as it finds hope for tomorrow. It unfurls a peculiar love story between Anna and Adrien in which the unsaid relationship between Adrien and Frantz becomes an underlying mystery. Was Adrien Frantz’s assassin? Were they lovers? Were they allies? There’s a palpable air of forbidden love as the memory of Frantz seduces Anna to her enemy. The complex political backdrop resonates with contemporary tensions of nations united and divide by old grievances and the film aligns itself within a clear tradition of poetic wartime romances when Ozon stages the most tense and riveting rendition of 'La Marseillaise' since the French soldiers belted it out in Rick's Café Americain. Like a post-war Casablanca with echoes of Michael Haneke’s allegorical The White Ribbon, FRANTZ offers a beguiling mystery about the hearts broken and healed by war. (French/German with subtitles)

(12A) 114 mins Thursday 6th July 2017 7:30pm
Director: François Ozon
Stars: Pierre Niney, Paula Beer, Ernst Stötzner

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Thursday 6th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE tells the real-life story of one working wife and mother who became a hero to hundreds during World War II. In 1939 Poland, Antonina Zabinska (portrayed by two-time Academy Award nominee Jessica Chastain) and her husband, Dr. Jan Zabinski (Johan Heldenbergh), have the Warsaw Zoo flourishing under his stewardship and her care. When their country is invaded by the Nazis, Jan and Antonina are stunned – and forced to report to the Reich’s newly appointed chief zoologist, Lutz Heck (Daniel Brühl). To fight back on their own terms, Antonina and Jan covertly begin working with the Resistance – and put into action plans to save lives out of what has become the Warsaw Ghetto, with Antonina putting herself and even her children at great risk. THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE is a tale of great heroism during very dark and perilous times.

(PG) 124 mins Friday 7th, Saturday 8th July 2017 7:30pm
Director: Niki Caro
Stars: Jessica Chastain, Johan Heldenbergh, Daniel Brühl

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 7th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

Saturday 8th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


THE HANDMAIDEN  

Set in 1930s Korea, during the Japanese occupation, Park Chan-wook’s sumptuous new film, THE HANDMAIDEN, is a twisting thriller adapted from Welsh writer Sarah Water’s much loved book, Fingersmith. Chan-wook’s film is divided into three parts and begins by telling us the story from the point of view of Sookee (Kim Tae-ri), a Korean pickpocket who is enlisted by a ‘Count’ (Ha Jung-woo) to help him seduce a rich girl, Hideko (Kim Min-hee), who is held prisoner inside a giant mansion by a sadistic book collector. Sookee is hired as Hideko’s maid, but instead of committing fully to the Count’s plan for him to seduce Hideki and steal her money, Sookee instead begins to fall in love with Hideko, leading to a number of erotically charged sequences that culminate in a number of highly stylised and exquisitely filmed sex scenes. The tension between the two women is electric, with a simple moment in which Sookee files down a tooth in Hideko’s mouth, being played in such a manner by Chan-wook and the two actresses, that you can’t help but hold your breath throughout. It’s like watching a fuse slowly burning down, with an explosion about to occur at any moment. Whilst there is no shortage of languid shots of the women in various states of undress, shots follow a logic that is all about getting us into the mindset of the two protagonists. In the second part the action switches to Hideko’s point of view and understanding her feelings. Park Chan-wook also makes it pretty clear that men are generally pretty awful – it is the women that hold the real power and need to break free from the patriarchal manacles thrust upon them – and also weak and easily manipulated by sex. There are a number of sequences in which we see men being read erotic fiction, and the reactions are entirely played for laughs, as they are revealed to be weak and rather ridiculous. Whilst not filled with laughs – this is at heart an erotically charged and thrilling potboiler – THE HANDMAIDEN is a great deal of fun and Park Chan-wook does a such a good job with the film’s many twists and turns that many of them will leave you with a broad grin on your face. THE HANDMAIDEN is like a corkscrew: the plot slowly twisting and turning, but gradually focusing in on one point. It’s brilliantly done and an absolute joy to watch. (Korean/Japanese with subtitles)

(18) 156 mins Thursday 13th July 2017 7:30pm
Director: Chan-wook Park
Stars: Min-hee Kim, Jung-woo Ha, Jin-woong Jo

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Thursday 13th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


MISS SLOANE  

In a time of fiery debate, just following a tumultuous election year, nothing is as timely or educational as John Madden‘s politically charged MISS SLOANE. The film tells the story of a brilliant and ruthless lobbyist, Elizabeth Sloane. She is notorious for her unparalleled talent and her desire to win at all costs. When she goes rogue to push a gun control measure in America, her career and morals are put at risk. Firmly entrenched as Elizabeth Sloane, Jessica Chastain manages one of her finest performances yet. Nimble in movements but nearly paralyzing in line delivery, the Oscar-nominated actress is unparalleled in her sheer excellence and commitment to the craft. The twist and turns of the tale allow her to precisely land each punch to the stomach with advancing intensity. It’s a complete and marvelously unstoppable force that is worthy of Academy Awards consideration. MISS SLOANE is an intelligent and informed look into the corruption of politics. It shows the vigorous nature in which politicians yearn to keep their positions and how our leaders are often picked and sabotaged. It crackles with excitement and performances. It unmasks the raw, honest truth of the system. It is the simmering gem of the year.

(15) 132 mins Friday 14th, Saturday 15th July 2017 7:30pm
Director: John Madden
Stars: Jessica Chastain, Mark Strong, Gugu Mbatha-Raw

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 14th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

Saturday 15th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


BREAKING AWAY  

BREAKING AWAY (1979) is a thoroughly delightful comedy, lifted by fine performances from Dennis Christopher and Paul Dooley. The story is a triumph for the underdog through sports genre, this time cycle racing. Christopher, Dennis Quaid, Daniel Stern and Jackie Earle Haley are four recent high-school graduates with no particular educational ambitions, yet stuck in a small college town – and a fairly snooty college town at that. But Christopher’s character is a heck of a bike rider and such an adulator of Italian champions that he pretends to be Italian himself, even at home. Pretending to be an Italian exchange student, he meets pretty coed Robyn Douglass and this ultimately brings the local boys into conflict with the more privileged college students which must finally be resolved in a big bike race. The relationship among the four youths is warm and funny, yet full of different kinds of conflicts. Quaid is very good as the ex-quarterback facing a life with no more cheers; Haley is good as a sawed-off romantic; and Stern is superb as a gangly, wise-cracking mediator. The events of one summer teach our young hero important lessons about love and life in a heart-warming and exciting tale. The coming of age story has been told many times before but never with more warmth and humour than in BREAKING AWAY.

(12) 97 mins Wednesday 19th July 2017 7:30pm
Director: Peter Yates
Stars: Dennis Christopher, Dennis Quaid, Daniel Stern

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Wednesday 19th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD  

Acclaimed filmmaker Guy Ritchie brings his dynamic style to the epic fantasy action adventure KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD. Starring Charlie Hunnam in the title role, the film is an iconoclastic take on the classic Excalibur myth, tracing Arthur’s journey from the streets to the throne. When the child Arthur’s father is murdered, Vortigern (Jude Law), Arthur’s uncle, seizes the crown. Robbed of his birth-right and with no idea as to who he truly is, Arthur comes up the hard way in the back alleys of the city. But once he pulls the sword from the stone, his life is turned upside down and he is forced to acknowledge his true legacy…whether he likes it or not. You can be sure that KING ARTHUR will be packed with high-octane action, epic deeds, and a great sense of fun.

(12A) 126 mins Friday 21st July 2017 7:30pm
Director: Guy Ritchie
Stars: Charlie Hunnam, Annabelle Wallis, Daniel Stisen 

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 21st July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


THE OTHER SIDE OF HOPE  

Director Aki Kaurismaki’s THE OTHER SIDE OF HOPE tells two very different stories which eventually converge around half way through this extremely funny comedy/ drama.  The first involves a Syrian refugee named Khaled (Sherwan Haji), a stowaway on a coal freighter who arrives in Finland after falling asleep while seeking refuge on the boat in Poland. Upon arrival, he immediately applies for asylum in Helsinki. Meanwhile, across town Wikstrom (Sakari Kuosmanen) is a shirt and tie salesman at the end of his tether who decides to change his career. After a successful game of stud poker, where he wins a large sum of money, Wikstrom buys himself a shabby restaurant in a corner of town and attempts to revive its poor trade, though he decides to keep on the three hapless employees who still work there. Khaled meanwhile has had his application for asylum refused, so he breaks loose as the authorities attempt to deport him back to Aleppo. He takes shelter in the back yard of Wikstrom’s new establishment and the new owner quickly takes him on by giving him a job cleaning, and a better place to stay. Kaurismaki’s film is both heartfelt and exceptionally funny. It’s a film that doesn’t look particularly attractive, but its political, racial and social undertones, along with a profoundly personal account of the crisis in Syria through the eyes of Haji’s Khaled make this engrossing throughout. The character of Khaled not only has the threat of being deported, but must also deal with constant racism, both from the police and citizens on the streets of Helsinki. The film deals with some very serious subject matter and darker themes but make no mistake, THE OTHER SIDE OF HOPE is very much a comedy and it is hilarious all the way through. (Finnish/Swedish/English with subtitles)

(15) 108 mins Wednesday 26th July 2017 7:30pm
Director: Aki Kaurismäki
Stars: Ville Virtanen, Kati Outinen, Tommi Korpel

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Wenesday 26th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


THE PROMISE  

Every year, on April 24, a solemn procession of men, women, and children commences in Yerevan, the capital of the former Soviet republic of Armenia. A sea of sad Armenian faces makes its way up to the hill of Tsitsernakaberd to the Armenian Genocide Memorial. It is here that every year the victims of one of the 20th century’s greatest crimes are quietly honored. An ancient Christian country located just south of Russia and east of Turkey, Armenia has seen much suffering in its long history. However, of all the tragedies experienced by this small yet resilient nation, none compares to the enormity of the Armenian genocide of 1915. The genocide was committed by the Ottoman Empire during World War I. Possessed by a fanatical nationalism, the ruling Young Turk government accused its Christian Armenian subjects of sympathizing with the hated Russian enemy. What followed was the planned, systematic, and ruthless mass murder of as many as 1.5 million Armenian civilians. To this day, Turkey continues to deny the historical reality of the genocide, despite overwhelming scholarly evidence. Terry George’s film THE PROMISE captures the magnitude of this history in a way that no prior film on the genocide has done before. With its sweeping cinematography, powerful acting, and all-encompassing story, it is a truly epic work that effectively and humanely conveys the story of the tragedy. The film’s story centers on the aspiring doctor Mikael Pogosian (well-portrayed by Oscar Issac) who leaves his native village in southern Turkey to study medicine in Constantinople. Betrothed to a young woman in his village, Mikael falls in love with the beautiful Ana Khesarian (Charlotte Le Bon), a French-Armenian woman, in Constantinople. However, she is also involved with Associated Press reporter Chris Myers (Christian Bale). In the midst of this love story, all three of the characters personally experience the genocide unfolding before them in different ways. Powerful and timely, THE PROMISE finally tells the story of one of the greatest human tragedies of all time.

(12A) 133 mins Friday 28th July 2017 7:30pm
Director: Terry George
Stars: Christian Bale, Oscar Isaac, Shohreh Aghdashloo

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 28th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

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